Quality Blog

Quality Blog Introduction


EPR’s project management, consulting, and restructuring experience is highly varied resulting in a unique view of the industry. A project managed poorly during construction may have many problems, like safety, schedule, over-runs, etc... However, plant quality is the most significant determinant of the forward value of the asset (plant).

This blog is not presented as deep technical reference but a strategy-level view.  It's assumed the more techincal members of our audience understand the basis for these observations. However, our intention is to bring a discussion level perspective of how construction quality impacts an owner, with enough technical content provided context. If the reader wants to know more about a technical subject (i.e. PWHT of P91) please refer to the reference codes, standards, and specifications for your project (i.e. ASME).

EPR believes all the problems identified could have easily been solved with proactive oversight.  If your project has finished and exhibits some of these concerns, or you are early in construction and desire to avoid these concerning problems, and the more dibilatating latent issues, please call EPR.

To discuss your project needs, please contact EPR...

Pinholes...


Engineered coating systems are complex, as mentioned in other postings.  When the manufacturer's recommendations are followed, these coatings are very good at preventing corrosion to the substrates.  However, if proper prep, mixing, contamination control, etc., is not followed there can be many different defects that render the coatings useless.

One such defect is known as "pinholes".  Often, or usually, this defect is not observable with the naked eye without magnification.  It's almost like worms ate holes down through the layers of coating.  Sometimes pinholes exist in a top coat, or maybe also the intermediate coating layer, but not penetrate the primer.  In other instances, the pinholes may extend all the way to the base metal.  If the coating is fairly new and pin point rusting is observed, chances are pretty good the pinhole goes to the base metal.

The remedy in such instances, is removal of the paint layer with the defect.  If the primer also exhibits the defect, all the coating material needs to be removed.  So, a "paint job" may look impeccable, but be a complete failure under... Read more

Contractor Savings

None.

Repair Costs

ROM - $25mm and a year of time by a well staffed painting contractor.

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